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20121205
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
up before, how much cooperation from the c.i.a. dod from the whitehouse, a. and did it affect at all the release date? >> well the release date was generated by the production schedule. i only finished the movie i'd say about 10, 12 days ago. >> rose: right. >> so we couldn't have release this movie any earlier than we are releasing it now. >> rose: [indiscernible] >> it helps, it definitely helps but mark was reporting the story and he was the one communicating with various sources. and really kind of getting inside that community in order to tell this story as faithfully as we could. >> rose: what did you know, both of you, but what did you know before may that you were working on? what kind of story were you doing. >> i was completely focused on toraboa. >> rose: really. do you know why he got away from torabora. >> can we make that movie. >> i can show you in the movie. >> rose: can you make that movie now? >> i don't know. >> rose: you worked on it, you got the elements there. >> just like in story how they got them. there's no one piece of the intelligence puzzle. it's a
over the years, i spent most of my career in cia trying to forecast what people would do, and how things would turn out and when it comes to saying what is going to happen, we have every reason to be very modest about our abilities to do that. because the truth is, we can monitor weapons, we can monitor movements of military forces, but the decision to use them or how to use them is something that often is a mystery to us. and sometimes because the protagonist himself doesn't know walt he is going to do. so i have -- i became very cautious and, again, it may have been one of the reasons i decided to leave, i became very cautious about the use of military force, because the consequences are so unpredictable. maybe it will be a small reaction, but maybe not. and then you are back in another big war. we saw two swift, successful military missions for regime change in iraq and afghanistan. we all know what came after that. we took out qaddafi, the rebels in liberty i can't took out qaddafi with the help of western air support. things aren't looking that great in libya right now, so wi
it was done, when he was in afghanistan and president obama was offering him as head job of the c.i.a. the head of fox news sends an fox news analyst to interview him and then delivers the real message. >> i got something to say to you, by the way. >> no one else was in the room i hope? >> well, directly to advance is-- >> i'm not running. >> that's not the question at this time. he said if offered chairman, take it. if you're offered anything else, don't take it. wait six months and run for president. >> cenk: that's amazing. that's the head of fox news. republican party tell general petraeus to take joints chief job that's offered. if the c.i.a. is taken, don't take it. drop out run for president. that's amazing. now look, petraeus did not take that. it's not like he's controlled by fox news, by apparently roger ailes thought i'll give it a shot. the news analyst katie mcfarland, and she had more--in fact, petraeus said rupert murdoch, the owner of news corp, also reached out to him. >> you might want to chat with roger and rupert mourdock for that matter. >> cenk: rupert is after m
. now our only chance, megyn, to pull this out, for the administration actively, get the cia on the ground, actively supply good quality weapons to the factions we know lean westward. and we can sort them out. it is a myth we can't tell the difference. and we have two interests in syria, in the long term. one, a rule of law democracy of sorts that doesn't abuse women and doesn't harbor terrorists. but there's another thing that people are overlooking. there's an operational prize for us. if we can get our hands on the assad's security services files, it would be a treasure trove telling us who in iraq was betraying us, what the iranians are doing, what the russians are up to. if we're not gaming how to get control of that stuff as soon as assad falls or at least access to it, we're throwing away another great chance. we're good at throwing away chances. megyn: why do say we need the cia to do it, not troops? there has been discussion in nato ground force in the context to stop assad unleashing chemical call weapons on his people? >> the issue of chemical weapons is something
that mean jack the cia director has to go to the defense director and said this is where i want to spend my money? >> guest: the office of the director of national intelligence cents a thousand four is responsible for negotiating the relationship with the secretary of defense. it is a difficult relationship. the department of defense, and i have seen this process, always tempted to reach into the intelligence committee and say, another 2 billion over there. let me just breezy dow little bit because i need is for my program over here. director of national intelligence. it's. >> guest: we have added more layers. it's not clear. >> host: on twitter. he says remember all of this spending contributes to gdp. cut military spending in there will be a job loss economic slowdown. >> guest: certain job losses for sure, and every drawdown we have done has involved a decline in employment. the we in question is not bill clinton. bush and clinton. it started under bush. 300,000 civil servants. coming out of the civil service. people come out of employment in the economy as well. what you have to keep in
to bob's recent book that when the cia brought the idea of this -- these drones, and he was recorded to have said kill the seniors, you americans worry about collateral damage and don't worry about things like that. of this is the first time in our young history we allowed foreign power to kill our citizens, for free, for nothing. at the same time, there's amazing initiative that come into place since the government has taken power so in 2009, last summer, we had the prevention of electronic crimes act, which applies to anyone of any nationality across pakistan, and carries jail sentences so if you have an e-mail address not registered in your fall name, that's a jail sentence of six months. if you are found guilty of spoofing or character assassinating the president, that's three years to 13 years. what constitutes that? is it a blog post? that's unclear. you also have this incredibly inept and criminal way the government has handled the floods. while the floods raged, they embarked on a pr join to the cross, dubai, france, england -- went back home for a bit, back to russia, imposs
through what he is going to do with cia director, with national security advisor, if any changes coming there, and maybe by presenting a whole team, including a new defense secretary nominee at the same time. some of the attention from this back and forth in a more partisan sense can be deflected in a more positive direction. >> thank you very much. michael, thanks for giving us real perspective on that op ed from the "new york times". appreciate that vemp. >> thank you, andrea. >>> the music world has suffered a nuj loss overnight. cross border singing sense station jenni rivera died when a small private jet carrying her and members of her entourage crashed in northern mexico. called the diana ross of mexican music, rivera was a hero among latin women and major player in a genre of music dominated by men. not only did she sell more than 20 million records, but her empire included radio and tv. her reality tv show on telemundo's sister network mundoz elhave aed her to millions. she leaves behind five children and two grandchildren. she was only 43 years old. ♪ but some things never ge
was interviewed by the cia when he left syria. now he's pleading for money and weapons from the u.s. so he can lead a brigade of fighters back into syria to secure those sites. alex marquardt, abc news, on the turkey-syria border. >> the major general gave an interview back in september. so several weeks back and says during his time there, we were in a serious discussion about the use of chemical weapons, including how we would use them and in what areas. we discussed this as a last resort. such as if the regime lost control of important areas such as aleppo. so not that we have them, but details have been discussed. >> he's the second in charge. he says that assad's forces are already spraying pesticides and dropping white phosphorous. claims that were also made by the opposition. but the reason the whole world should be concerned about this is because if it gets into the wrong hands, these chemical weapons are so easily transportable. you're thinking hezbollah could get them in their hands and anybody that's friendly with syria at this point. so that is why -- >> again, if you're wondering
of the shoulder-fired missiles known as manpads which the cia were trying to track and contain in libya, may have migrated to syria, bringing down a syrian fighter jet and helicopter last week. then there are reports of chemical weapons, sarin gas being loaded into canisters for possible use. the u.s. set up a task force at a base north of ammon, jordan with 150 u.s. special forces working on a plan to secure assad's chemical weapons. >> the whole world is watching, the whole world is watching very closely and the president of the united states has made very clear there will be consequences, there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. >> reporter: earlier this year the pentagon estimated it would take 75,000 ground troops to secure the tons of chemical weapons in assad's possession. that is it more than the number of u.s. troops in afghanistan right now. in the meantime, the administration's public statements appear designed to at least deter the assad regime from using them. next week in an international conference
of terrorist ties. phillip mudd, a former cia and fbi counterterrorism official, says there's a huge concern over who to trust with chemical weapons. >> when you've got roughly 10% of the opposition in the. >>>s u.s. government is declaring are terrorist group you're going to be concerned. in any case like this, there's a lot of risk. >> reporter: but mudd says it's still better to train the rebels on how to handle those materials than to do nothing. and leonard specter says the u.s. and its allies are likely screening the individuals who are being trained very carefully, wofrl, at least that's the hope. >> despite all that, there's still a potential for these chemical weapons getting into the wrong hands. despite what the u.s. is trying to do. >> reporter: phillip mudd says if the syrian regime loses control of these weapons, that's a huge worry. if they fall into the hands of others who are not trusted by the u.s. or its allies they could float around the border to iraq or other potentially dangerous places where they don't have control over these things. if assad loses control of these th
doctor who was a c.i.a. informant and helped us hunt down osama bin laden? he's reportedly been tortured in a pakinstani prison, according to his brother. back in june, the doctor was sentenced to 33 years behind bars for conspiring against pakistan. now six months into his sentence, is the united states doing enough to secure his release? let's talk to fox news legal analyst, peter johnson, jr. >> he's being left for dead. >> steve: he is? >> he's an honorary american. 3,000 lives, more, on september 11. >> steve: he's being tortured. >> he tried to get bin laden and infiltrated through a dna ruse, hepatitis vaccine. now he's been tortured, burned with cigarettes, according to reports. he's been shocked. he was blindfolded for a year. he had his hands tied behind his back for a year. the state department says we're trying to get him out. we're trying to negotiate a release. there was a bill the defense authorization act of 2013 trying to limit the $800 million going to counter insurgency funds in pakistan and saying, listen, the department of defense has to sign off that they're doing e
in the muslim countries and leadership changes in the arab spring countries. former cia specialist is joined by the washington journal's editorial page devotee and others, the foundation for the offensive democracy hosts this event. it's just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. thank you for that introduction and thank you, all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be very lively debate. we are going to be asking the question of democracy is the triumph in the middle east islamic victory is unavoidable and essentials. this is the motion that we will be debating in the intelligence square format for the requests from ruel and brian. they have had a practice round. occurred on power. the revolution in egypt has taken many turns. the muslim brotherhood has come to power through the ballot box, but that has been marred of late thanks to mohamed morsi, the president of egypt earning him the moniker on atwitter of morsilini or mubarak with a beard, and now as we look around, we are not sure where this revolution is going and nor are we aware were the of the
it and why are we doing it? >> remember, we are not at war with pakistan. this is being done by the c.i.a. it's not being done by the military. there is a whole series that legal questions coming up from the united nations and countries around the world investigations going on. we are supporting some of the bills that are asking for investigations. the dowell tap which if it can be proven may well be an actual legal war crime is there's a strike, people are hurt and i had a young boy tell me this story and it was very, very powerful. people then wanted to go to help the people who have been hurt by the drone strike, many of them who are innocent and they're afraid to go because those who are helped are hit with often what's called a double tap. the video we just released, 178 children, children have been killed by the drones. that's an extraordinary number and it's very clear these are not terrorists. >> they say anybody who is military age male, what does that mean, we're all military aged males, they can bomb this whole place it's considered a militant. we don't know if that's true, but the
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)